, but their current A*-G IGCSEs will remain available.

A Levels and GCSEs are well respected by employers, colleges and universities as they show that you are bright enough to work at a higher level, you can work hard to achieve a goal and you can manage your time efficiently.

Full-time further education – retaking GCSEs alongside A levels

GCSEs are available in more than 60 subjects and vocational areas.

→ → Your choices at 14 - GCSEs: compulsory and optional

Exam boards said they were powerless to stop schools from making teenagers sit GCSEs in maths or English before they reached 16, even though they said that this might not be in the child’s best interests. Ofqual, the exams regulator, blamed record numbers of younger pupils sitting GCSEs for a dip in higher grades for the second year running. It said candidates sitting GCSEs at 15

Get about the content of these GCSEs

Michael Gove has already made courses in core subjects such as Maths and English much tougher. Now the exam regulator Ofqual is drawing up new rigorous guidelines which are expected to jettison ‘easier’ GCSEs altogether.

These GCSEs can lead to similar progression paths as traditional GCSEs.
The (EYFS) sets out the requirements for staff to child ratios in settings delivering the EYFS and the qualification levels that practitioners must hold.The EYFS has been revised and the will be implemented from 1 September 2014.What has changed?Qualifications at level 3 and above that meet the will be considered full and relevant.To count in the ratios at level 3, staff holding an early years educator qualification must also have achieved or above.The following qualifcations have been agreed as acceptable equivalencies to GCSEs in English and Maths at Grade C or above:If you hold a level 3 early years educator qualification but do not have a GCSE in English and maths at Grade C or above, you can be counted within the staff to child ratios at level 2.The requirement for early years educator qualifications and GCSEs in English and maths will not be applied retrospectively. Staff and learners who hold or are working towards existing full and relevant qualifications will still be able to practice and will not need GCSEs in English and maths at Grade C or above. GCSE stands for General Certificate of Secondary Education. These are crucial qualifications for anyone leaving secondary education. They provide information for colleges or employers about your skills and learning between the ages of 11 and 16. Most employers or institutions looking at your results will expect at least 5 A to C’s with emphasis being placed on English, Maths and Sciences. Many students will leave secondary schools with 10 or more GCSEs.The requirement for early years educator qualifications and GCSEs in English and maths will not be applied retrospectively. Staff and learners who hold or are working towards existing full and relevant qualifications will still be able to practice and will not need GCSEs in English and maths at Grade C or above. GCSE examinations are taken by most pupils at the end of compulsory school education (year 11)in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. GCSE provides a uniform framework for assessment, with all candidates in all subjects graded from A* to G (with U being the result given to those whose papers are "ungraded"). Scotland has a different system altogether, with examinations called Standard grades, Higher grades and Advanced Higher grades, which are taken at different ages. Taking GCSEs is not compulsory, and it is up to schools whether to enter pupils for examinations.
For students starting GCSE courses from September 2016, a number of other GCSEs will be changing.

Students will take exams for new GCSEs, graded 9 to 1, in:

If you decide to pursue full-time further education, you should be able to retake GCSEs within a year, alongside A levels or other qualifications including the .

Further subjects will see new GCSEs introduced over the following two years.

GCSEs explained — Brightside - Bright Knowledge

These are modified versions of the IGCSEs which have been approved by OFQUAL for use in UK state schools and count towards school league tables. This is an issue for schools entering their own students, but is mostly irrelevant to private candidates. The Cambridge/Edexcel Certificates are almost identical to the corresponding IGCSE offered by those boards, and generally use the same textbook for most subjects. Often the exam papers are identical too, particularly in maths and the sciences - the exam paper has two different codes on it, and the only difference is the wording on the certificate you receive at the end. Home-educated students can choose which qualification to enter for. Note that the AQA Certificate is being discontinued when the GCSE Reforms and the last exam season will be summer 2017. For Edexcel and CIE, the IGCSE syllabus will remain but the 'certificate' version as it currently stands will not be available after the introduction of new 9-1 GCSEs.

Students get the chance to take resit exams for new GCSEs in English language and maths.

Most students taking their GCSEs study nine or ten subjects.

As well as GCSEs, there are other qualifications and courses you can do in Years 10 and 11. At the moment these are either Functional Skill courses and National Vocational Qualifications (NVQs). Either way, there are some things you have to do, and then a certain amount of choice. Here is a list of subjects you will have to continue, in one form or another, over the next two years: